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NASA Senior Scientist at MCTC

Anne DouglassThe MCTC STEM Career Internship Club, in collaboration with Augsburg College, invites all MCTC students, faculty and staff to a great lecture by Dr. Anne Douglass, senior scientist of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center.

The lecture, Finding My Way Through the Ozone Layer, will take place Tuesday, April 14 from 1:15-2:15 p.m. in S.2400.

For more information about the club or the event, please contact Rekha Ganaganur, Chemistry and Biotechnology instructor and club advisor at Rekha.Ganaganur@minneapolis.edu.

About Anne R. Douglass, Ph.D:

Anne Douglass is a senior scientist with the Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. She has worked with NASA since 1981, and is presently a project scientist for Aura, the Earth Observing System atmospheric chemistry satellite that was launched in 2004.

Her research uses atmospheric constituent observations along with models to understand and predict the evolution of stratospheric ozone and other species that are important to ozone and climate.

Douglass is a Fellow of the American Meteorological Society (1998) and the American Geophysical Union (2007). She received a NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal in 2009 and a NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal in 2012.

She spent many years studying physics, obtaining a BA from Trinity University in Washington, D.C. (1971) and a master of science from the University of Minnesota (1975). She began her career in atmospheric science and the use of satellite observations at Iowa State University where she completed her PhD in physics (1980).

About Finding My Way through the Ozone Layer

My 30-plus year career in the atmospheric chemistry and dynamics laboratory at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center began in 1981 following a lengthy graduate school career that featured two universities, experimental work, development of a primitive atmospheric model, and a growing family. On arrival, I began to learn about atmospheric chemistry, especially that related to stratospheric ozone and the connections between chemistry and climate. The maze I call my scientific career is filled with unexpected twists and turns and even a few blind alleys, but most of the time satellite measurements of ozone and other trace gases helped me keep my bearings. Although complexity of Earth system modeling, computational requirements, and computational capabilities have all increased dramatically during my career, the “back-to-the-data” approach has prevailed and is likely to continue to do so for decades to come.
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